Posts Tagged ‘martin luther king’

The legacy of Black Confederates will always persist, a closer look at the fulfillment of Martin Luther King’s dream

Monday, May 16th, 2011

by Ann DeWitt

“I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia, the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.”
~Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Picture of Dr. Marting Luther King, Jr.

Picture of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Dreams do not always materialize the way we imagined them to come true.  Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s prophetic message of an America consumed with unity is happening before our eyes during the Sesquicentennial of the American Civil War.   Unfortunately,  a sect exists with the determination  of blocking one of the key revelations of Dr. King’s dream, solely because Dr. King’s dream is not unfolding to their satisfaction.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. said, “I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia, the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.”  One of the common intersecting points of the recent coming together of sons of former slaves and sons of former slave owners is centered on the subject of Black Confederates, African-Americans who served in various capacities with the Confederate States Army. 

Though not all forefathers of  Sons of Confederate Veterans (SCV) members owned slaves,  several chapters of the SCV brotherhood currently extend their reach across the table between former slaves and the sons of former slave owners—the common ground is where slaves and slaveholders travelled together during the American Civil War.  Thus, Dr. Martin Luther King’s dream is revealed through men such as Edward Smith, Nelson Winbush, Al McCray, Sam Young, and H.K. Edgerton to name a few. 

The research on Black Confederates continues to garner further understanding of the dynamics surrounding African-American service with the Confederate States Army.  Desmond Tutu states it best by saying “Equality is the moral compass.”  If a man during the 19th century served in a military capacity, shouldn’t he be acknowledged as a soldier in the 21st century?

For the faction who states that Americans should neither celebrate nor commemorate the American Civil War, I challenge them to alternatively celebrate and commemorate the fulfillment of Martin Luther King’s dream during the Sesquicentennial.  The legacy of Black Confederates will always persist because Dr. Martin Luther King’s dream persists.

For more information on the subject of Black Confederates, visit www.blackconfederatesoldiers.com.  Young adults can also learn more by reading the fiction novel titled Entangled In Freedom: A Civil War Story.

Highlighting the Good in Humanity,
Ann DeWitt